About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 9
CSPAN2 3
KGO (ABC) 1
KOFY 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
's mentioned, he was a president back then, too, of harvard law review. so he is used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power, the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discover they're not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps the faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to rice a special vision, talent and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's founding. and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding iserrer moanny -- ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october 1912 that reported the event. the papers reported that the distinguished f
. the source noted that the truman era law is so old it would take weeks to implement. even if the old law expires don't expect immediate spike if milk prices. >>> congress is still working to find agreement on the $60.4 billion emergency spending bill for hurricane sandy victims. some conservatives want the government to cut back spending in other areas in exchange for relief money. the new york and the new jersey governors ask for bigger aid packages. >>> the powerful winter storm swept through half of the country and left many in dark. arkansas, 15-inchs of snow caused widespread daniel to power lines and cutting electricity to 200,000 customers. chicago has already reached 500 homicides before the end of this year. the highest level in four years. windy city is desperate to lower its murder rate. correspondent mike tobin looks at one initiative to supporters hope will do just that. [ siren ] >> guy in the middle of the street. looks shot. >> gangland shooting part of every evening in chicago, the gun control debate is ongoing. solution passed by the cook county board of collisioners an
vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that , you have a certain risk factor. was it reall
americans from adopting russia children. i can't believe this happening in retaliation law for cracking down on russia human rights vialators. >> these children are not available to international adoption until after they have been on a domestic registry for eight months n our son's case, 22 families, russia families came to see him and rejected him because of his blood line. >> julia: this woman was on o'rielly and laura ingraham was hosted it . she had adopted two russian children. she doesn't know if they will see the boy. they have gone over there constantly to get close to the little boy. more than 60,000 russian children have been taken in by americans in the past two decades. massive winter storm that killed 16 people so far continues to move over the northeast. it is expected to head into canada today as many travelers are trying to get home after christmas. they had flights cancelled all over the place and delaying 8000 more. many northwest states saw a foot of snow . in vermont, 21 inches. hard-hit arkansas, 200,000 homes and businesses lost power. the bush family said, put away th
of renewable energy. these things are some of the changes in environmental law relative to emissions -- they are all part of that effort. we have got to do more. we have to build on that. but it is certainly a commitment. one thing we recognize is that it does not have to be a competition between our economy and our health, because renewable energy and clean energy have economic benefits that are pronounced, and people understand that. so we highlighted the issues we felt needed to be highlighted for voters who are going to make the decision in the election, but the president's agenda is reflected in his work, and i expect he will continue to work hard on this issue is. >> let's take these last questions as we wrap this up. >> thanks for coming back to the university of chicago. i have a quick follow up. yourding super pac's -- just now reclaim your concerns about unlimited money in campaign financing. on the other hand, we saw earlier today had democrats were already oiling up their machines for 2014 and 2016. what are the prospects for repealing citizens united or comprehensive cam
a remarkable career here on abc 7. stay with us. kx;x$ú >>> a federal appeals court blocked the california law banning day conversion therapy, pugt the law on hold until it can hear arguments on the issue the law banning conversions be there aims to turn gay minors straight was to take affect january 1. counselors and two families say their teen-aged sons benefited from it sought the injunction after a lower court redees -- refuse aid request. >> news that 800 jobs in chevron headquarters are being moved to houston, texas. david louie is live tonight and sounds like officials there got very little warning. >> they didn't get very much warning. the mayor tells me that he got the bad news yesterday afternoon from chevron but apparently, the plan to moist jobs to texas had been underway for months. >> this is not something you want to see. it's a big impact here. >> 800 jobs represents just under a 4th of the 3500 employees at the san ramone headquarters. chevron says it told workers but didn't make it public until sending out an e mail yesterday. five business units are involved, all support the
blocked california law banning gay conversion therapy. ninth circuit court of appeals issued emergency order putting the law on hold until it can hear full arguments on this issue. the law banning conversion therapy that aims to turn gay minor straight was to take effect on january 1st. counts lors who practice the therapy and 2 family who say the teenager son benefit from it saw it injunction after lower court refused their request. >>> big oil making a big move out of the bay area. chevron announced today it's moving 800 workers out of its san ramone headquarters for greener pasture in texas. here's business technology reporter david. >> it's not something that you want to see losing 800 job. that's a big impact here in san ramone. >>reporter: 800 jobs is a fourth of the total work force at san ramone headquarters. chevron told affected work twors months ago but didn't make it public until it sent out an all employee e-mail yesterday. all 5 of these support 7 ron and all workers now work side by side in houston. chevron said the headquarters will remain in san ramone. stewart
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
of these people trying to leave the in-laws house. >> rick: we learned the other day that gretchen loves her in-laws. >> gretchen: exactly, because there was a study and the mother-in-law takes the hit. >> rick: there must be a few people who say i can only handle three days of her. i can't go home -- >> gretchen: are you going to help them out. >> rick: you might have to spend four or five days there, get ready. find some way tie a break. there will be really big storms. >> gretchen: let's talk about this morning with an extreme weather alert. deadly storm system that slammed the midwest, snow and tornadoes heading northeast this morning. >> oh, my god, look. that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: so that tornado spotted in mobile, alabama. am i saying that correctly? >> rick: yeah. mobile. >> gretchen: okay, good. one of the hardest hit cities, tens of thousands of people there waking up the day after christmas now without power. >> when it calmed down, we looked and everything seemed green, like it was popping off transformers left and right. we heard a noise. i
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
to serve. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. patrick dempsy has a strong tie to the city. wish him luck. back to you. >> clayton: lack of security. and so we thought according to the new york post security officials that were sacked after the release of the benghazi report are still on the government's pay roll and will be back to school with work. here is the reaction lieutenant cornel tony schafer. when you heard the report that came out around christmas, what did you think? it is an extended montyepython skit. the idea here is that these people are not held accountable . this is but one more layier clayton of regarding the whole ben
>> and i have the right to petition the courts if the don't agree with a law. we are not going to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by >> juliet: wake up, everybody, it's saturday, december 29th. i'm juliet huddy. down to the wire for a fiscal cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
of family life so that the rest of us can feel safe. my son-in-law is currently on the pace of deployment and my daughter in the special operations and my heroes. fear is part of their everyday. although my name is in writing this chapter in the book i cannot take all the credit. i was still so broken at the time i was asked to write in a difficult expressing myself. there is input for my husband, gary, matthews wife theresa who was his high school sweetheart and worked with him on the student council and his naval academy friends. matthews story would not have been written without their input and i deeply thank them for all of their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrificey and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom is not free. god bless our military families in god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you ,-com,-com ma lisa. thank you mrs. freeman. war brings sorrow and weakness, but through the challengechallenge s we face over the past 10
consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think sometimes google's of the sale is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates with $26,600 worth of debt and over 13% default within three years. we have more outstanding student at than auto or credit- card debt at this point. many may think it is good that we have more student debt than credit-card deb
you are a republican from georgia or a liberal democrat from manhattan, as soon as a law like that gets passed, people become creative in finding ways to qualify. out of the woodwork, all the folks that would qualify. at the end of the david acton & social security age for everybody was truly disabled and let the market take care of its. people in stress occupations for many years now have been leaving those stress occupations well old age of 65 to go into some other line of work. a good example is people that install floors. it's tough in your knees. you see very few people doing that passed the age of 40. they find other work in the construction sector. baseball players have saw money, they don't have to work when they are done. host: let's hear from paul, a republican, in indiana. caller: how are you? there's a competing network of button tot has a access "rise above." if i had a button, it would say stop wasteful spending. how much money we would save if we stop wasteful spending. guest: we could also find our sunny and obscure and ridiculous government spending programs.
. arizona's attorney general proposing to change the state law that would allow an educator in each school to carry a gun. the "l.a. times," the city of los angeles collected more than -- this story is unbelievable. they collected more than 2,000 firearms part of a guns for groceries buyback program. 75 assault weapons were included in that and two rocket launchers were turned in for cash. >> they got steak and shrimp for the rocket launchers. what about teachers with guns in classrooms? >> i mean, it's amazing to me. i had randy wine gart ten of the american federation of teachers on my show last night. it's outrageous to me on two levels. one, you're going to put more guns into schools it to try to deal with getting guns out of the school. you don't have money for students. you don't have money for sports and arts. you don't have money for anything you need in school, but you're going to find money to buy guns, bullets and training for teachers? where did the conservatives come up with this money from? how, if you had an armed teacher, would that have solved newtown? it would have made t
, then say, how can you be in a congress? who got arrested? you violated the laws. and i said, they were proud laws. their customs, they were tradition and we wanted america to be better. we wanted america to live it to the declaration of independence, live up to or create them make real our democracy. take it off of people and make it real. so when i got arrested the first time, i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever before, i feel free and liberated. you know, abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves. but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to free and liberate a nation. [applause] now i know some of you are asking, where did you get the name "across that bridge"? where did you get the title from? life lessons and a vision for change. take a few short years ago that this is an election year. hundreds of dozens of million people from virginia to texas. could not register to the based on the color of their skin. people stood in line. we take a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 and the voting age population more than 450,000, but only 1
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)